Ken Paxton fired five of his senior assistants in 2020. Four of those five then filed suit alleging whistle blowing. I wrote then that it appeared to be a classic case of whistle blowing. Whistle blowing occurs when a worker reports a violation of criminal law by the employer and then suffers reprisal from that

The case of the mysterious Ken Paxton machinations continues to develop. I previously wrote here and here about the whistleblower allegations against him. Four of his fired aides filed a lawsuit. Their lawsuit papers provide further details about their allegations. They allege that real estate developer Nate Paul was helping Mr. Paxton remodel his house

Four former top aides to Attorney General Ken Paxton are suing him for violating state whistle blower laws. I wrote about that lawsuit here. AG Paxton has hired Bill Helfand, a well-known Houston employment lawyer, to defend him. Mr. Helfand will be paid $540 per hour for his services. In answer to the lawsuit,

As expected, Ken Paxton has provided generous lawsuits to his former deputies. Four of his recently fired senior assistants have filed suit based on whistle blowing. They allege they were fired because they reported violations of law by AG Paxton. see my prior post about their whistle blower complaints here. The lawsuit rightly notes

Ken Paxton is the Attorney General of Texas. Recently, seven of his top deputies submitted information to the AG’s Human Resource department accusing their boss of corruption. It is hard to over-state how extraordinary that is. Assistant AG’s are not liberal. They are generally careful and conservative. It is also obvious they reported the apparent

I previously wrote about the federal court’s interpretation of the Texas Election Code here. In that decision, the Western District of Texas found that fear of contracting the coronavirus does indeed constitute a disability. Now, the Texas Supreme Court has weighed in. TheTexas Supreme Court reached the opposite conclusion, that fear of the virus

I wrote a post the other day stating that mere fear of contracting the COVID19 virus is not a disability for purposes of the Americans with Disabilities Act. See that post here. But, in a similar lawsuit concerning mail-in balloting, the Western District of Texas has found that anxiety over the coronavirus does indeed

The U.S. Congress passed the Uniform Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act in 1994. Congress based the act on the “necessary and proper” clause of Article I, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution. That means, said the Corpus Christi court of appeals, that the act did not waive sovereign immunity of the states. See Texas

The Waffle House, Inc. v. Williams, 313 S.W.3d 796 (Tex. 2010), decision was issued a few years ago. In that decision, the Texas Supreme Court decided that a lawsuit based on a tort claim of sexual assault was actually subsumed by the Texas Commission on Human Rights Act. I wrote about that decision here