So, Justice Alito’s leaked draft opinion suggests Roe v Wade will be overturned. What does that possibility suggest for other rights? Justice Alito wrote in the draft opinion that the 14th Amendment did not specifically name abortion and otherwise does not protect a right to abortion. The draft opinion concerns the case of Dobbs v.

Increasingly popular during the pandemic are apps known as “bossware” and “tattle ware.” These software programs allow supervisors to track the work performed by work-from-home employees. These apps can monitor websites visited, log key strokes, take screenshots and even record video and audio. But, do such apps violate an employee’s privacy? Some states, such as

Attorney General Ken Paxton asked his followers to harass Court of Criminal Appeals judges regarding a prior decision. That decision held that the AG cannot prosecute election fraud cases without permission from the local District Attorney. I previously wrote about AG Paxton’s call to arms here. It was an extraordinary call from any elected

The decision in Burlington Industries, Inc. v. Ellerth, 524 U.S. 742, 118 S.Ct. 2257, 141 L.ed.2d 633 (1998), set up a framework for employers to avoid liability. An employer can avoid liability for harassment of an employee if the employer has a robust system in place for reporting on-the-job harassment. Once such a reporting

Proving discrimination is never easy. Discrimination requires proof of intent. The plaintiff must prove or show what some manager was thinking. In Thompson v. Zinke, 795 Fed. Appdx. 294 (5th Cir. 2/27/2020), the plaintiff alleged he was discriminated against when he was passed over for promotion. Mr. Thompson noted that a white applicant with


In a new decision on the issue, a federal judge in Chicago has ruled that reduced seating does amount to an “interruption” in business for purposes of insurance coverage. The insurance carrier, Society Insurance, had submitted a motion to dismiss the lawsuit. Judge Edmond Chang said capacity limits can constitute “direct physical loss” for “business

In Union Pacific RR Co. v. American Railway & Airway Supervisors Assoc., No. 18-50110 (5th Cir. 12/16/2020), the Fifth Circuit reversed a grant of summary judgment in favor of the employer. A railroad employee, Roland Beltran, twice tested positive on a drug test. Aided by the union, he appealed to arbitration. He presented evidence

Lawyer Jerome Marcus has asked to be allowed to withdraw from his lawsuit against the state of Pennsylvania. In that suit, he represents Pres. Trump. The suit alleges voting irregularities. Lawyer Marcus is known for his statement in court several weeks ago that he is alleging “a non-zero” number of Republicans observing the vote tallies.

The Fifth Circuit has resurrected the self-serving affidavit theory. The theory makes no sense. The so-called self-serving affidavit refers to persons who submit testimony in the form of an affidavit. If the affidavit supports the witness, then that testimony carries less weight – or no weight. In Salazar v. Lubbock County Hospital District, No.