In 2002, in reaction to the Enron scandal, Congress passed the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. The Act protects whistleblowers who report violations of securities regulations regarding accurate reporting. See National Whistleblower Center post regarding the act here. There was a whistleblower at Enron who did try to report the violations of securities regulations. And, here in

In Office of the Attorney General v. Rodriguez, a supervisor reported possible insurance fraud to her supervisor at the Office of the Attorney General of Texas. Laura Rodriguez believed she had a duty to report fraud, waste or abuse. She reported possible fraud concerning her her long-time friend and administrative assistant, Debbie Galindo. Ms.

The Texas Whistleblower Law has many limitations. One of those limits includes the requirement that the whistleblower must report the alleged violation of law to a law enforcement authority. For most laws, the local police force would be the appropriate authority. But, what about those many obscure white collar type crimes? We see one such

Texas has a whistleblower statute. It applies only to government workers. In a recent whistleblower decision, the Fourth Court of Appeals here in San Antonio reversed a grant of summary judgment. In the case of Torres v. City of San Antonio, No. 04-15-00664 (Tex.App. San Antonio 12/7/2016), Lt. Torres worked for the City Fire

In a recent opinion, the Texas Supreme Court clarified one key aspect of whistle blower complaints.  The Texas Whistleblower statute applies to government employees only.  See Tex. Govt.C. Sec. 554.001, et seq.  The statute protects an employee who reports a possible violation of law.  The report or question must be to an "appropriate law

Many laypersons people are familiar with the retaliation part of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.  That anti-retaliation provision prohibits retaliation against someone who opposes discrimination.  Title VII is a federal statute.  Texas is an at-will state.  But, even so, Texas does have a few state anti-retaliation statutes.  

Texas prohibits reprisal

Whistleblowers have a rough row to hoe.  George Green knows this better than anyone.  A former architect for the Texas Dept. of Health and Human Services, he blew the whistle on shoddy building practices at DHHS some 25 years ago.  DHHS fired him in 1989 for alleged sick leave issues.   In 1991, the jury

The employee of an Illinois law firm was fired when he refused to cooperate in issuing fraudulent bills to clients.  The law firm claimed the hours performed by an in-hpuse employee were actually performed by an outside investigator.  The firm then billed at the higher rates used by outside investigators.  One of the in-house investigators,