Many potential clients, friends and some folks I barely know share their knowledge with me about employment law.  Unfortunately, many of them are flat wrong. Here are a few of the more common employment law myths I encounter.

  • At will

“At will” employment means an employee can be fired for anything.” Texas is an at-will

More and more, Texas employers rely on non-compete agreements. More and more, those agreements are permeating down below to blue collar jobs. In Elite Auto Body v. Autocraft, No. 03-15-00064 (Tex.App. Austin 5/5/2017), Autocraft sued Elite Auto Body and three former employees of Autocraft. Autocraft claimed the three employees took trade secrets with them

Some folks refer to the President as the Twitter-in-Chief. Well, he should also be considered as the Litigator-in-Chief. He tossed out provocative statements at campaign rallies like they were candy. At one rally in Louisville, he exhorted his supporters to rough up a couple of protesters. He also added, as the protesters were being forced

When a local politician wins office, she or he like to bring in their own persons for key positions. Sometimes, they also like to fire the employees who supported their opponent. County Clerks from here to Timbuktu will seek to replace you if you support the defeated opponent. But, the County Clerks who do so

There are a lot of myths out there about employment law. From time to time, I talk about a few of those myths.

At will
“At will” employment means an employee can be fired for anything.” Texas is an at-will state. An employee can indeed be fired for a lot of things, but not for

People talk about "free speech rights" all the time. But, in reality, our free speech rights are rather limited. Until the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Lane v. Franks, No. 13-483 (6/19/14), for example, "free speech" did not apply to speaking publicly about a co-worker at the risk of one’s job. Edward Lane testified before