Depositions are usually pretty mild. But, sometimes they include some drama. Jonathan Langley sued IBM for age discrimination. He alleged that a reduction in force was used to pare the number of older workers. At his deposition, he relied in part on some documents given him by current employees of IBM. These documents included slides

It is always hard for celebrities to accept the basic rules of litigation, such as the witness has limited control over a deposition. In a recent deposition, Justin Bieber violates almost every rule of how to successfully testify in a deposition. He objects on his own behalf to reasonable or halfway reasonable questions, he argues

A deposition is when one side has the opportunity to cross-examine an opposing witness prior to trial.  It is a key event in the discovery process.  Lady Gaga, whose real name is Stefani Germanotta, is being sued for unpaid overtime by a former legal assistant.  Jennifer O’Neill claims she is owed $393,000 for 7,168 hours

Depositions of the employee victim in a discrimination case is a key event.  The employee must demonstrate that s/he can tell a coherent story and maintain some composure about one of the most difficult events in his/her life.  Deposition strategy for the employer’s lawyer essentially is to obtain information from the employee.  Often, the defense

Depositions are key events in any lawsuit.  The Opposing Counsel has the freedom to ask questions that lead to admissible evidence or questions which are reasonably calculated to lead to admissible evidence.  That standard allows a broad range of questions.  Most plaintiff employees are understandably nervous about being deposed regarding their case. 

Some plaintiffs, for

I have talked about this before, but it needs repeating.  See my prior post.  The plaintiff employee deposition is critical to success for any employment lawsuit.  The plaintiff employee must be able to show the opposing attorney and the employer that the employee can testify, can present well to a jury and can tell

 A similar question arises in all my employment cases.  In a recent case, the defense lawyer was deposing a witness who supported my client.  He asked why she thought the manager’s remark was discriminatory.  Upon hearing that swine flu was predominant in the Rio Grande Valley, the manager had remarked, "Well, what do you expect

Plaintiff attorneys are sanctioned almost $400,000 after their client made 868 changes to her deposition testimony. The dissent points out, however, that the attorneys sent the changes not to the court reporter but to the defense attorney. It is likely the attorneys wanted to make known the client’s apparent perjury.
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