I previously wrote about a butt-shaking lawyer here. Attorney Dennis Duffy shook his “booty” to the opposing attorney at a mediation. He mocked the attorney’s ponytail. Dennis Duffy was a  big firm lawyer at the time. The opposing attorney, Alfonso Kennard filed a motion asking the judge to disqualify Mr. Duffy from representing the

Alex Jones and InfoWars provide a good lesson in how not to conduct a lawsuit. Alex Jones and InfoWars are being sued for making false claims that the Sandy Hook Elementary school massacre was not real. One of the parents of the murdered children, Neil Heslin, sued Mr. Jones for defamation in Travis County, Texas.

A court in New Jersey struck the entire closing argument made by the defense attorney in a lawsuit against Johnson & Johnson. Several plaintiffs are suing Johnson and Johnson on the basis that asbestos in talcum powder decades ago caused them to contract mesothelioma in the plaintiffs’ stomach linings. Mesothelioma is a type of cancer.

A major law firm, Pepper Hamilton, conducted an investigation into claims of rape and sexual assault by female students at Baylor University. In 2016, the law firm found fundamental flaws in how Baylor University handled these claims. Coaches were fired over the scandal that emerged. Now, some of those women have sued the university. In

Lawsuits are generally emotional. Both sides feel strong emotions as the lawsuit progresses. It is tempting to seek a megaphone of some sort and proclaim to the world the injustice being foisted upon us. But, only a few of us have the megaphone Alex Jones has. Alex Jones, the infamous Infowars host has been sued

Depositions are usually pretty mild. But, sometimes they include some drama. Jonathan Langley sued IBM for age discrimination. He alleged that a reduction in force was used to pare the number of older workers. At his deposition, he relied in part on some documents given him by current employees of IBM. These documents included slides

Parties to a lawsuit rarely discuss sanctions, but at least in federal court, sanctions are a real, if rare, possibility. Secretary of State for the state of Kansas, Kris Kobach, learned about sanctions. Mr. Kobach was advocating for the state’s voter ID law. The federal judge hearing the matter struck it down, finding that there

Filing suit in federal court is different. Federal court differs from state court in some key respects. One of these respects concerns attorney withdrawal. In state court, most judges would quickly grant a motion to withdraw. Not so in federal court. In GDC Technics, Ltd. v. Grace, No. 15-CV-488-ML, the Defendant’s counsel asked to

The trial for the “toughest sheriff” has concluded. I previously wrote about that trial here. The “toughest sheriff” has chosen a strange defense. As his trial reached its conclusion, his attorney argued that the “toughest sheriff” did not have a good lawyer. The lawyer did not explain the judge’s ruling to him, for eighteen

In litigation, social media has become a very hot issue. Many parties think they can obtain that final, critical piece of evidence from social media. One example is Facebook. Many employers involved in a lawsuit request the employee’s Facebook posts for a certain time period. The rationale is that a victim of discrimination cannot legitimately