San Antonio employment law

What happens when an employer obtains access to your Facebook page? In Galvez v. City of Katy, No. No. H-18-4221, 2019 US Dist LEXIS 20634 (S.D. Tex. 2/8/2019), we see an employer who accessed Maria Galvez’ Facebok page while she was out on leave. The City had access to her page, because Ms. Galvez

What do you do if your employer refuses to take precautions for the COVID-19 virus? Mike Jackson chose to continue working for his employer, Briggs & Stratton, in Wisconsin. In April and May, Briggs & Stratton was not requiring face masks. Workers were working face-to-face on the assembly line. Managers rarely wore masks. The company

What happens when an employer requires everyone to come to work, but the COVID-19 continues to spread? After the initial shut-down, Valero Energy Corp. required all of its 1800 office workers to report to work by June 1, 2020. In the past month, 32 of those employees have tested positive for COVID-19. Several workers have

SPC Vincent Ibarria, 21 years old, died in Afghanistan recently. SPC Ibarria was assigned to the 10th Mountain Division. He died in a vehicle rollover accident. SPC Ibarria joined the Army in 2017. He was described as a soldier who always volunteered. He believed firmly in the motto, “Choose the harder right over the easier

In the Iraq war, like all wars, we lost a few buddies. Each death carries with it these tremendous ripple effects. For every death, 5, 6 soldiers or more say, “If I had been there SGT Saenz would still be with us. I should have gone out on that patrol.” The guilt, as irrational as

I previously wrote about a butt-shaking lawyer here. Attorney Dennis Duffy shook his “booty” to the opposing attorney at a mediation. He mocked the attorney’s ponytail. Dennis Duffy was a  big firm lawyer at the time. The opposing attorney, Alfonso Kennard filed a motion asking the judge to disqualify Mr. Duffy from representing the

I previously wrote about the federal court’s interpretation of the Texas Election Code here. In that decision, the Western District of Texas found that fear of contracting the coronavirus does indeed constitute a disability. Now, the Texas Supreme Court has weighed in. TheTexas Supreme Court reached the opposite conclusion, that fear of the virus

I wrote a post the other day stating that mere fear of contracting the COVID19 virus is not a disability for purposes of the Americans with Disabilities Act. See that post here. But, in a similar lawsuit concerning mail-in balloting, the Western District of Texas has found that anxiety over the coronavirus does indeed

So, a friend called me. She is a lawyer in small town Louisiana. She has been working a few years for a Public Defender’s office in a parish seat. She has been working from home, but now they want her back by next Monday. My friend has been diagnosed with Diabetes Type II. She also