Well, AG Ken Paxton lost another court hearing. I wrote about his loss at the district court level here. AG Paxton appealed that decision to the Third Circuit Court of Appeals in Austin. That court affirmed the denial of the motion to dismiss. Four senior level employees at the AG’s office complained to the

Ken Paxton fired five of his senior assistants in 2020. Four of those five then filed suit alleging whistle blowing. I wrote then that it appeared to be a classic case of whistle blowing. Whistle blowing occurs when a worker reports a violation of criminal law by the employer and then suffers reprisal from that

In a remarkable decision, the Fifth Circuit affirmed the grant of a 12(b)(6) motion to dismiss. In Meadows v. City of Crowley, No. 10752 (5th Cir. 5/3/2018), the plaintiff submitted a 36 page complaint detailing how an African-American police officer was passed for promotion five times. On appeal, the plaintiff alleged that the district

Under the Texas Whistleblower Act, a person who works for a governmental entity and who reports violations of law is protected. Chad Carter worked for the City of Abilene as an engineer. He complained to his superiors that the city had hired contractors who were using unlicensed engineers. Using unlicensed engineers violates the Texas Engineering

Well, two dancers won their trial last March. So, now Tiffany’s Cabaret has settled with the remaining dancers. I previously wrote about this case and trial here. The dancers sought a collective action, which is the name for a class action under the Fair Labor Standards Act. About half the dancers could not join

There are so many cases discussing the burden of proof in discrimination cases. It is even more complicated when the plaintiff is alleging mixed motives. Mixed motive cases refers to those cases that have a mix of motives, unlawful and lawful. For example, a plaintiff who alleges she was overlooked for a promotion due to