Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act

The U.S. Congress passed the Uniform Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act in 1994. Congress based the act on the “necessary and proper” clause of Article I, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution. That means, said the Corpus Christi court of appeals, that the act did not waive sovereign immunity of the states. See Texas

Arbitration of legal disputes has become so common that now it has even invaded the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act of 1994 (USERRA). Navy Lt. Kevin Ziober filed suit against his former employer after it fired him. BLB Resources, Inc. fired him on his last day of work before just before he deployed

A reader asks a question.  Her business employs a Reservist who will be gone for two weeks doing military training.  The employer understands it needs to give him his time off.  But, does the business also need to pay him his salary during his absence?  

Good question.  No, the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment

Some cases come close to home for every lawyer.  For me, its cases involving Iraq and Afghanistan veterans.  I served in Iraq 2005-06 as a Reserve officer.  So, I have some familiarity with veteran issues.  The stigma regarding PTSD is often overblown.  In this case reported by WFAA in Dallas, a veteran suffered reprisal because