The U.S. Congress passed the Uniform Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act in 1994. Congress based the act on the “necessary and proper” clause of Article I, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution. That means, said the Corpus Christi court of appeals, that the act did not waive sovereign immunity of the states. See Texas

Arbitration of legal disputes has become so common that now it has even invaded the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act of 1994 (USERRA). Navy Lt. Kevin Ziober filed suit against his former employer after it fired him. BLB Resources, Inc. fired him on his last day of work before just before he deployed

One would hope for better from the U.S. Postal Service.  They employ many veterans.  They have a veterans hiring program.  But, in the case of Army Reserve Sergeant Major Richard Erickson, the USPS attempted to terminate his employment even before the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan started.  SGM Erickson was fired from his USPS job

A reader asks a question.  Her business employs a Reservist who will be gone for two weeks doing military training.  The employer understands it needs to give him his time off.  But, does the business also need to pay him his salary during his absence?  

Good question.  No, the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment

The Sixth Circuit has rendered a decision regarding a veteran who sued under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, 29 U.S.C. §791.  The Rehab act applies to federal employees who have disabilities.  The Americans with Disabilities Act was based in large part on the Rehab Act.  In this Sixth Circuit decision, the appellate court affirmed the