National labor Relations Board

My Cousin Vinny was a wonderful movie in many respects. One of those respects involves the cross examination by Vinny of a so-called eye witness. After close questioning, the “eye witness” admitted he had made eggs and grits while the two defendants were supposedly robbing a small, rural store. As Vinny explained, the witness could

I wrote about this McDonald’s lawsuit a couple of years ago. See my prior post here. The lawsuit represented a new approach to franchisees. For years, even decades, persons suing franchisees could not also sue the parent company. A person could sue the local McDonald’s, but not the parent company. The theory was that

T-Mobile has work rules including: 1) Maintain a positive work environment, 2) No arguing or fighting; respect co-workers, 3) no photography, or video or audio recording, and 4) no access to electronic information by non-approved persons. The National Labor Relations Board found these four rules to violate the National Labor Relations Act. The NLRA allows

Sometimes, the San Antonio Express-News just does not get the story straight. In a story, entitled “Franchisees Fear a Chain of Ruin,” the report suggests the NLRB has made drastic changes to the law regarding joint employers. See San Antonio Express-News report. The NLRB has done nothing like that. See my prior post about

McDonald’s hamburger chain is facing the first test of a new approach to franchise workers. The new approach started with a NLRB decision last Summer that found in certain cases, the parent franchisor could be responsible for employment decisions made by the franchisee. See my comment about that decision here.

The McDonald’s case started

In a recent ruling, the National Labor Relations Board has adopted a new standard regarding joint employers. Joint employers is a relatively new creation in the area of labor and employment law. Joint employers, as the name suggests, refers to separate employers both being employers of the same employee. Many years ago, I worked on

Well, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has reversed the regional director in Chicago who had ruled that Northwestern University football players could form a union. The ruling from the national level found, instead that allowing union organizing could lead to imbalances in competitive football. See CBS news report. The ruling did not address

photo courtesy of tom213

The Northwestern football players will now cast their votes for or against forming a union. I wrote about this union movement previously here. Only scholarship players may vote. The school has already appealed the NLRB’s decision that the football players are employees and may form a union. The appeal will be

The National Labor Relations Board has decided that college athletes can form a union. To reach that determination, the NLRB had to first find that football players are "employees" of the school. Football players at Northwestern University had sought to form a union.  I first wrote about their request here.

The Northwestern University quarterback,

Every so often, I talk with an employee who has been treated badly by his employer, but for whom there is no lawsuit available.  S/he has no discrimination claim.  The employee is simply treated unfairly, for which there is no remedy in Texas.  So, I typically tell such clients they should form a union if