Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

As often happens with serious injuries, the recovery period is hard to predict. In Severson v. Heartland Woodcraft, Inc., 872 F.3d 476 (7th Cir. 2017), Raymond Severson took his full 12 weeks of leave under the Family Medical Leave Act. He was addressing his serious back pain. On the last day of his leave,

The “outing” of celebrity sexual harassers continues.¬†John Besh, the celebrity chef from New Orleans, has admitted to an improper sexual relationship. A female employee filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission alleging he pressured her for a relationship. The New Orleans Times Picayune has reported that 25 current or former female employees

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has sued a local icon, Whataburger. The Tallahassee Whataburger, the EEOC alleges, harassed a manager after she refused to hire only white people. The EEOC claims the General Manager told the assistant manager to only interview people with “white sounding” names. Vanessa Burrous, instead, hired seven black employees and one

Its a small thing really, but it can be so helpful. The EEOC has adopted a new national policy that it will allow persons who file an EEOC Charge to obtain a copy of the employer’s explanation. The employer is required by federal statute to provide a response to the employee’s charge of discrimination. The

The Fifth Circuit issued a strained interpretation of events in the recent case of Norbach v. Woodland Village Nursing Center, Inc., No. 13-60378 (5th Cir. 6/18/2015). In Norbach, the employee at a nursing home refused to pray the rosary with a resident. She was asked to do so by a co-worker. She was

Target has reached a settlement with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission for $2.8 million regarding Target’s use of personality tests in hiring. It no longer uses the tests. But, it formerly used the tests for executive and professional level hiring. Target dropped the tests when the EEOC started its investigation in 2006. The EEOC’s investigation

The employer who lost its discrimination trial in 2012 has dropped its appeal.  A jury in U.S. district court awarded three plaintiffs $200,000 in damages.  That amount was later reduced to $140,000 due to statutory caps on damages.  See San Antonio Express News report.  

The manager was accused of using the "n" word