A jury verdict for $366 million is very rare. It is especially rare for a single plaintiff case. It is even more rare in federal district court. Yet, that is exactly what happened in Harris v. Fedex, No. 21-CV-01651 (S.D. Tex.). Jennifer Harris sued Fedex for discrimination and for retaliation after she complained about

What sort of person seeks to profit from the murder of dozens of children? Twenty of the victims were between 6 and 7 years old. Yet, for years, Alex Jones sought to profit from the deaths of children killed at Sandy Hook Elementary. In so doing, he inflicted emotional torment on their families. For this,

The Texas Attorney General’s flubbed a prosecution against six sex traffickers, because they lost contact with the victim. The high profile prosecutions was known as “Operation Fallen Angle.” In the small town of Gatesville, Texas, in central Texas, this prosecution was a big deal. Six persons accused of trading crystal methamphetamine for sex are now

In 2019, I  wrote about the Torres v Dept. of Public Safety case here. That case has now been decided in favor of Capt. Leroy Torres, a Texas Guardsmen. The DPS would not accommodate his illness, which he contracted during his tour in Iraq. Capt. Torres then filed suit under the Uniformed Services Employment

In Lindsley v. TRT Holdings, Inc., 984 F.3d 460 (5th Cir.  1/7/2021), the Fifth Circuit reversed a grant of summary judgment regarding the plaintiff’s claim that she was paid less than her three male predecessors. Writing for the majority, Judge Ho said it was apparent that she was paid less than the men who

I am an Iraq veteran. I served in Iraq from 2005 to 2006. Some 140,000 other brothers and sisters served in Iraq with me. I am told there were some 1.5 million total who served in Iraq. Wherever I go, I find a bond with fellow Iraq and Afghanistan vets. We share the bond of

Million dollar verdicts in employment cases are rare. But, they do occur. In one lawsuit against Glow Networks, Inc., nine African-American employees sued the company for racial discrimination. The jury not only agreed, they awarded $70 million to the nine workers. Glow Networks, Inc. is a telecommunications firm.

Among the evidence was the experience of

David Yamada, law professor at Suffolk University Law School, has written extensively on workplace bullying. He writes the blog on workplace bullying at Minding the Workplace. He published a seminal paper on workplace bullying in the Georgetown Law Journal in 2008. See that paper here. Mr. Yamada has drafted a model bill entitled,

In Johnson v PRIDE Industries, Inc., 7 F.4th 392 (5th Cir. 2021), a co-worker referred to Michael Johnson, a black worker as “mijo” (son) and “manos” (hands) several times.  The same co-worker, Juan Palomares, also referred to Mr. Johnson as “es mayate” (this n—–) on some occasions. Mr. Palomares also used the term “pinches

In Austgen v. Allied Barton Security Services, LLC,  No. 19-20613, 2020 U.S. App. LEXIS 20085 (5th Cir. 6/26/2020), a security officer, working for the Port of Houston, encountered back pain in inspecting vehicles. The pain was chronic and had been aggravated by climbing around vehicles. His employer told him to stay home on unpaid