On Nov. 25, 2019, Judge Jason Pulliam granted the employer’s motion for summary judgment in Richardson v. The Medical Team, Inc., No. 18-CV-00151 (W.D. Tex.). It is a remarkable case. On Jan. 20, Renee Richardson emailed HR that she believed she was the victim of discrimination based on her race. She accused Alan Garza

How does a person show racial discrimination? Two ways come to mind: 1) a person must show he was fired and replaced by a person of a different race, or 2) show he was disciplined differently than persons of a different race. There is more to it than those two methods, but one of those

The Fifth Circuit has again applied a “pretext plus” formula to affirm a grant of summary judgment. In Harville v. City of Houston, Mississippi, No. 18-60117 (5th Cir. 8/16/2019), the City fired a deputy clerk. The City Clerk, Margaret Futral, testified that Mary Harville was an essential deputy clerk who worked on taxes.

An engineer worked for Texas Commission on Environmental Quality or 23 years. Shiyan Jiang was never in any trouble until in 2014, he was assigned a new boss, Kim Wilson. The new boss believed Mr. Jiang placed some papers in a permit folder that did not belong there. The plaintiff then filed a complaint alleging

The Eleventh Circuit recently overturned summary judgment in a discrimination case. In Vinson v. Koch Foods, No. 17-10075 (11th Cir. 5/23/2018), the plaintiff sued for discrimination based on her national origin, Puerto Rican and based on race. She had worked for the employer a couple of years in Human Resources as a clerk and

In a recent decision, the Fifth Circuit overruled Judge Lynn Hughes, again. The Fifth Circuit reversed Judge Hughes’ grant of summary judgment on several claims. The claims started when Karen D’Onofrio left Vacations to Go, the largest seller of ocean-going cruises in the world. Karen was a sales representative for Vacations. After a couple of

It is difficult to find a lawyer who specializes in employment law and who represents employees. Most employment lawyers represent the employer and are not willing to represent employees. The typical plaintiff starts out talking to Personal Injury lawyers, because PI lawyers advertise. So, many times, the employment plaintiff must file his/her own case pro

The Fifth Circuit reversed summary judgment in another case recently. In Caldwell v. KHOU-TV Company, Inc., No. 16-20408 (5th Cir. 3/6/2017), the court addressed ADA and FMLA issues. Gerald Caldwell worked at KHOU TV as a video editor. Due to a childhood disease, he needed the aid of crutches for walking. Mr. Caldwell notified

There are various constructs which serve to limit access to juries for discrimination victims. One of those constructs is the so-called “same actor inference.” The same actor inference provides that if the same manager who hired an employee later fires that same employee, then it is unlikely that that manager was motived by discriminatory animus.

Many employees find themselves in a real quandary when the employer asks them to commit an illegal or unethical act. Texas law protects a worker who is asked to break a criminal statute. But, some employees become so vexed about their situation that s/he goes to the media. That is what happened in Peine v.