Some judges are exceedingly difficult. Judge Lynn Hughes in Houston seems to consistently press folks’ buttons. Most recently, he has barred a female Assistant U.S. Attorney from his court. Tina Ansari has appeared in Judge Hughes’ court twice in the past few weeks. She was excused from the court by Judge Hughes both times right

Judge Lynn Hughes in the Southern District of Texas is a difficult judge. He harangues attorneys who appear before him. He cancels discovery, even though the federal rules of civil procedure provide otherwise. He is a difficult judge on several levels. In the case of USA v. Swenson, No. 17-20131 (5th Cir. 7/3/2018), the

In a recent decision, the Fifth Circuit overruled Judge Lynn Hughes, again. The Fifth Circuit reversed Judge Hughes’ grant of summary judgment on several claims. The claims started when Karen D’Onofrio left Vacations to Go, the largest seller of ocean-going cruises in the world. Karen was a sales representative for Vacations. After a couple of

The Fifth Circuit reversed a summary judgment, but the district court ruling was by Judge Lynn Hughes in Houston. So, perhaps that is not so surprising, after all. I have written about Judge Hughes before here and here. In the case of Cannon v. Jacobs Field Services North America, Inc., No. 15-20127 (5th

I previously wrote about Judge Lynn Hughes of the Southern District of Texas here and here.  Again, he has ordered no discovery in a lawsuit that could not function without discovery.  And, again, he has been overruled by the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals.  See opinion here.  The Fifth Circuit seems to be

Judge Hughes spoke in a discriminatory way about Jitendra Shah and his lawsuit.  I previously wrote about Judge Hughes’ ex parte  discussion here and here.  The Judge discussed the merits of a lawsuit even though the plaintiff’s lawyer was absent.  And, he made some stereotypical comments about Indians, Caucasians, state government workers and Indian

Lilly Ledbetter sued her employer for pay disparities which had occurred over years.   She worked for Goodyear Tire and Rubber for decades.  She sued based on the Equal Pay Act, a federal statute.  She lost.  The U.S. Supreme Court found that she sued too late.  The statute of limitations required her to sue within

In a poorly thought out opinion, Judge Lynnn Hughes of the Southern District of Texas ruled earlier this year that breastfeeding is not related to pregnancy.  See my prior post on this ruling.  A female employee had been fired because she was planning to breastfeed at work.  Women are protected from discrimination based on