Plaintiffs in employment cases often contend they are paid less than other, similarly situated co-workers. The Defendant then argues no, the plaintiff does not truly know that. Many times, the court will side with the employer and find that the employee is relying on speculation when s/he claims to “know.” Since, many plaintiffs are relying

There are a few law firms that specialize in representing employers in employment cases. A very few of those firms operate nationally. One such law firm is Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak and Stewart, PC. Ogletree Deakins represents employers everyday regarding employment matters. They have offices across the country. Yet, that firm is the defendant in

In 2013, Prof. Cheryl Kelsey filed a lawsuit against Texas A&M at San Antonio alleging sex discrimination and unequal pay. According to her lawsuit, she was hired as an associate professor by Texas A&M for the 2009-10 academic year. She was promoted to assistant professor for the 2011-12 school year. Yet, she was still paid

The Equal Pay Act is a statute that requires that women be paid the same as men who perform the same work. The Equal Pay Act was passed in the 1970’s as an amendment to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, which prohibits discrimination against minorities. Texas passed its version of Title VII,  Texas’

Last August, Gov. Rick Perry vetoed a statute that would have amended the state version of Title VII the way Congress amended Title VII to allow women to sue for discrimination in their pay. See my posts here. The state version of Title VII is known as the Texas Commission on Human Rights Act.

Lilly Ledbetter sued her employer for pay disparities which had occurred over years.   She worked for Goodyear Tire and Rubber for decades.  She sued based on the Equal Pay Act, a federal statute.  She lost.  The U.S. Supreme Court found that she sued too late.  The statute of limitations required her to sue within