Litigation and trial practice

Well perhaps it is not surprising that Alex Jones disregarded the Judge’s instructions to not discuss the case with anyone. Of course, Alex Jones and Infowars host Owen Shroyer discussed the current Travis County trial on his show. The Judge pressed Mr. Jones’ lawyer, Andino Reynal on that issue. The lawyer assured the judge no

Well, as we might imagine, the Alex Jones Infowars trial is not going well for Infowars. A producer, Daria Karpov testified and she evaded many questions. She evaded questions about Infowars’ audience size. The questioning then addressed the “crisis actors” issue. Alex Jones had claimed many times that the Sandy Hook Elementary children were not

Much of litigation has become about dispositive motions- motions that dispose of the case. Typically, that means motions for summary judgments. The employer submits a motion for summary, or quick judgment, saying the employee lacks evidence for the lawsuit. Both sides may offer affidavits. What happens when a plaintiff’s affidavit contradicts – or appears to

Ken Paxton cannot stay out of the news. He also does not hesitate to advance novel, even tenuous legal theories. I previously wrote here about the State Bar of Texas filing suit regarding AG Paxton’s law license. Now, AG Paxton has  responded by filing a motion to dismiss the lawsuit. In his motion to dismiss,

Judges have employed principles of decision-making since time immemorial. One such principle is “judicial restraint.” This principle assumes what should be obvious: courts and judges retain their authority only so long as their decisions are perceived as mostly fair. Pres. Andy Jackson once remarked about a decision by the Supreme Court which he did not

The Fifth Circuit has again tried to rein in Judge Lynn Hughes of the Southern District in Houston. In Bailey v. KS Management Services, No. 21-20335 (5th Cir. 5/26/2022), Judge Hughes again prohibited discovery by the plaintiff. As the Fifth Circuit noted, this is the third time some plaintiff has appealed a no-discovery order

Lawyer Lin Wood, who filed several frivolous lawsuits on behalf of former Pres. Trump, was ordered to seek a mental exam. The Georgia Bar Association ordered him to sit for the exam. Mr. Wood then filed a lawsuit seeking to overturn that order. The Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta rejected Mr. Wood’s appeal.

Well, Attorney General Ken Paxton cannot say he is surprised. The Texas Bar Association has taken action against his bar license. Just a couple of weeks ago, the Texas Bar first sued Paxton’s First Assistant, Brent Webster. Mr. Webster signed the same very weak lawsuit that AG Paxton filed in 2021. I previously wrote about

Attorney-General Ken Paxton is determined to get into trouble. He filed that very weak lawsuit in 2021 seeking to overturn the 2020 election results. Sixteen Texas lawyers, including four former Texas bar presidents, filed an ethics complaint about that weak lawsuit. In Texas, any person can submit a complaint about a lawyer’s ethical practices. I