There are several things an employer can ask in an interview. Let’s discuss a few.

1. How old are you? This is not a good question to ask. There are very few jobs in which age is a legitimate requirement for the job. Inevitably, this question will suggest age bias. It is best to not go there unless you are hiring for jobs with clearly appropriate age requirements, such as the U.S. Army.

2. Are you married? If you ask this only of female applicants, then this question could cause problems. Why would this question be helpful? Unless this is a ruse to discovery whether a female applicant might quit when she wants to have a baby. Its best to just not go there….

3. Are you a US citizen? It would be best to not ask this question until a job is offered. This question could conflict with the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. It could also serve as evidence in an ethnic origin case, if the question is only asked about Hispanic or Hispanic-appearing applicants.

4. Do you have disabilities? Do not ask this specific question. But, an employer can ask if an applicant has any limitations that would keep him/her from performing essential functions of the job. How else would a fire deaprtment make sure an applicant can carry someone out of a burning building? So, yes you can ask about physical or mental limitations that would impair the performance of the essential functions of the job. But, do not ask about disabilities or diagnoses until a job offer has been made.

5.  Do you take drugs, smoke or drink? An employer can ask about drinking, smoking or illicit drug use. An employer should not ask about legal or prescription drug use, since that might involve issues of a possible disability.

6. What religion do you practice? An employer cannot ask about religious practices. Since, that could be used as evidence later of religious discrimination.

7. What is your race? No, of course, this would be an inappropriate question. See No. 6 above.  Don’t we all know not to ask this by now?

8. Are you pregnant? This question could be used as evidence of female stereotyping and, therefore, as evidence of gender bias. So, it is better not to ask this question. And, as the article mentions, refusing to hire a woman based on pregnancy or possible pregnancy would violate the Pregnancy Discrimination Act.

All of these warnings only matter if some adverse personnel action occurs later for which there is no otherwise reasonable explanation. If an employer asks about pregnancy and then later fires the applicant for some trivial error, only then would questions asked in an interview have any relevance. A discrimination lawsuit requires first and foremost a negative personnel action with no otherwise reasonable explanation. The lack of an otherwise rational explanation for an adverse personnel action is what makes prior discussions possibly relevant. The best defense for any employer is to simply issue written warnings whenever a transgression occurs. Emphasizing written discipline, applied consistently will serve the employer very well.

To mark Memorial Day, I would also like to recall two area San Antonio heroes. They were both fiends of mine. They both died in war zones back in 2005 and 2006 when I was deployed myself.

SSGT Clinton Newman was a fine soldier. He was a bright young man in the 321st Civil Affairs Brigade during my brief time with the 321st here in San Antonio. One of the nice things about being in your hometown unit is that I actually ran into a member of my unit at a movie. I ran into SSGT Newman when he was at a movie with his girl and I was with mine. He was one of the few 321st soldiers still here back in late 2003 and early 2004, while most of the unit was deployed. See a biographical sketch to learn more about someone who would have been a fine citizen of San Antonio and was already an excellent soldier.

I served with Albert E. Smart way back in the 2/141 Infantry Battalion in Corpus Christi. We were young company commanders together. Albert was gung-ho and always smiling. Years later, I was quite surprised to see him in the 321st CA Brigade here in San Antonio. He deployed in 2005 and passed away in Kuwait on the way to Afghanistan. It was such a shock that someone so young, in such good physical shape would pass away from an illness. I think Heaven is in much better physical shape now that Albert is there. And, I expect there are a great many more smiles among its citizens. See a memorial here to learn more about my buddy, Albert.

Memorial Day is a time to remember those veterans who gave all they had to give for us. I always think of  1SGT Saenz at times like this. Some 100 of us IRR members met at Ft. Jackson on March 13, 2005. We reported to Ft. Jackson, South Carolina for in-processing and reintroduction to the US Army.  We knew we would be deploying to Iraq.  Then MSGT Saenz had a huge laugh and a booming voice. He laughed a lot.

Those first few days, some Reservists were angry about being called up. Some were happy to be there. MSGT Saenz was reasonably happy to be where he was, preparing for duty in a war zone. Later, as I learned, he performed very well. He inspired his soldiers. He did everything a competent, dedicated leader would be expected to do.

He died in the dusty streets of Baghdad near the end of our tour. We were leaving Iraq in just a couple of weeks when his HMMWV was struck by an IED. He was out on a convoy training members of the incoming unit. Some of his regular team members were not with him on that run. He died doing what he did very well: serving others.

We should all serve our country half as well as 1SGT Saenz. There is a nice tribute to 1SGT Saenz here. As John Bear Ross mentions on his website, do not mourn that a man like 1SGT Saenz died. Rejoice that a man like 1SGT Saenz lived.

After Ft. Jackson, we, the IRR folks, were assigned to various Civil Affairs units. I was assigned to the 445 CA Battalion. We called ourselves the Pirates. Whenever we snapped to attention, we would all let out a gutteral “arrgh” in true Pirate fashion. Paul A. Clevenger was a Pirate. He was one of the younger soldiers. SGT Clevenger was promoted from SPC4 during our time In Iraq. He did well, from what I heard.  I just remember that he smiled, often. His obituary is here.  Like many of us, he returned to the States with some demons deep inside. He took his life some two years after we returned. SGT Clevenger is another casualty of the war  – he too gave his country all he had to give.

On this Memorial Day, we remember the fallen. But, its also a good time to thank a vet for his/her service.

 

The trial date for SGT Bowe Bergdahl has been set for October 23, 2017. The trial will be held at Ft. Bragg. His attorneys had tried to dismiss the case due to Pres. Trump’s prejudicial statements during the campaign. The judge denied the motion. But, the attorneys have appealed the decision. See Task + Purpose news summary.

Back when I was active in the Nationals Guard and Reserve, I would visit other Army units to coordinate exercises, gather information or for some particular need. I soon noticed that when subordinate members of the unit would freely chat with an unknown captain or major, that was very likely a strong unit, with good morale. If the lower ranking member would not chat with me, that indicated problems. The military is like a large corporation, with different corporate culture in each unit.

In today’s corporate culture, social media has made it easier for employees to chat publicly about their experiences. Uber received a lot of blow back when one engineer described the ride-sharing company as chaotic, sexist and overly aggressive. Susan Fowler wrote a blog post about her year at Uber. The attention has grown so much that it may affect the value of a likely IPO later this year for the business. See San Antonio Express News report.

Ms. Fowler mentioned how she was propositioned by a male senior manager and that Human Resources often protected “high performers” at Uber. Consumers who notice issues between employees notice that tension, according to research at Georgetown University. That research found consumers react strongly to perceived problems with a particular brand. Christine Porath, the Georgetown researcher, also found that companies that devoted more attention to the welfare of its workers performed better during the recent economic crisis.

Uber’s CEO reacted to Ms. Fowler’s blog, saying the company would heal the wounds and build a better corporate culture. Yes, employees, all employees, matter. Human Resources, often overlooked, is on the front lines of that culture. In military terms, we would describe HR as a “force multiplier.” HR provides much more value that simple processing of forms. It makes the other departments better. The corporations, and military units, that appreciate that will become much more productive.

 

One of the great things about practicing law is working with people. We see people often at their worst, sometimes at their best, but always as their genuine selves. From a Texas Bar Journal, I find this story about two spouses who prosecuted their own divorce. The two spouses wrote their own divorce decree. Since they were planning to continue to share the same house until it was sold, they came up with some rules on sharing that household, which they hoped would minimize friction:

  • Husband shall exceptional care during and after Dallas Cowboys games to not break any material objects in the house and to remain cordial to wife, who is not responsible for the outcome of sporting events (emphasis in the original).
  • Wife shall endeavor to give Husband the space he needs to recover from Cowboys losses.

That is just two people trying to work things out…..

The colonel hearing the court martial of Bowe Bergdahl will not dismiss the charges against the young sergeant. He agreed the comments by then Candidate Trump were troubling. But, he would not agree they were so pervasive and unfair as to saturate the community and cause prejudice. See CNN news report. The lawyer for SGT Bergdahl will appeal.

All I can say is the defense has a pretty good appeal issue now or later. Candidate Trump’s comments were very unwise. He repeatedly referred to SGT Bergdahl as a traitor during his campaign.

Its a fundamental part of the military court martial process that a commander may not discuss a pending court martial. Anything a general says will prejudice the military jury. But, what happens when the commander speaking about a prominent court martial is a candidate for president? Donald Trump spoke often about Bowe Bergdahl. The candidate referred to him as a traitor many times and at least once, suggested he be dropped out of a plane. Candidate Trump is now Pres. Trump. His words have consequences.

SGT. Bergdahl’s lawyers have filed a motion claiming they cannot obtain a fair trial. The Army lawyers have responded that the use of the term “traitor” was not meant in a legal way, but in a “conversational” sense, whatever that might mean. They also argue that no reasonable person would interpret Candidate now Pres. Trump’s words as anything other than campaign rhetoric. Again, I do not know what that means. Words have consequences. The military lawyers cannot un-ring the bell. They cannot withdraw or undo Mr. Trump’s words. I am doubtful the Army authorities will accept that sort of explanation. See CBS news report. If these remarks had been made by a general, there is no question the court martial would be dismissed. Those sorts of remarks do indeed prejudice any potential military jury. That the remarks were made by a candidate for President might make a difference. We will see.

There is a reason why candidates for any office generally refrain from commenting about pending cases.

There are many issues with Pres. Trump’s travel ban. One important consideration is the risk it poses to U.S. troops serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. We still have several thousand soldiers in Afghanistan and a few hundred in Iraq. Add to that the thousands of U.S. civilians in support of the soldiers serving in those two countries and you have a good many Americans who serve as handy targets for ISIS and Al Qaeda. Political issues that affect the Middle East reverberate in Iraq and Afghanistan. The jihadis are motivated when they hear the U.S. or Western nations supposedly oppressing Moslems.

When I served in Iraq, every staff tracked attacks on Coalition (i.e., U.S.) forces. The statistics were part of the daily briefing presented to every commander. We knew there would be a spike in attacks anytime Middle East or Israel issues became part of the public debate in America. It was part of our intel or “enemy situation” briefing. It is without doubt that right now as we speak, soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan are scaling back their activities to some degree to avoid the large spike in attacks. For your average revenge minded terrorist, mainland U.S. is a long way to go. But, northern Iraq and central Afghanistan not so much. See the Brian Chasnoff column in the San Antonio Express News in which Rep. Will Hurd speaks to that concern. Congressman Hurd is a former CIA officer. He would know. As a former U.S. Army officer, I also know. Talk tough here. But, over there, they pay the price.

Donald Trump advocated torture during his campaign. He even advocated targeting the families of alleged terrorists. “Task & Purpose,” a nice veterans website, discusses the legal ramifications for soldiers during a Trump administration. As the post explains, Mr. Trump argued in favor of water boarding “and a helluva lot worse than waterboarding” during the campaign. Recently, he walked his comments back a bit. But, then Mike Pence, the new Vice-President, said the administration would never discuss what it would never do. So, torture and unlawful killing may still be on the agenda. The post points out that the USA did not agree to the international agreement that created the International Criminal Court. So, the only enforcement power for a soldier refusing to obey an unlawful order would be the same executive branch that would order the torture. US military members are not subject to the International Criminal Court.

The Trump administration could redefine noncombatant to include families of terrorists. The 2016 National Defense Authorization Act limits interrogations to practices found in the Army Field Manual. But, the administration could allow for “extraordinary rendition,” as the Bush administration did. That is, the Trump administration could out-source torture. But, some of these directive to interrogate with extreme methods could be directed toward the ordinary soldier. Those sorts of orders are rarely written. The average soldier might have the opportunity to consult with a JAG lawyer. One could expect the military chain-of-command to support whatever legal cover the White House offers. During the Bush Administration, the White House Legal Counsel wrote a memo authorizing torture. Most JAG lawyers would surely defer to legal opinions from some other entity. So, even if a practice were considered illegal right up to the day of some memo, it would then magically be considered lawful afterward.

I have to add as an aside, however, that many JAG lawyers were troubled by that White House memo. Many JAG lawyers would explain the difficulties involved in changing the definition of “torture” and provide pretty good counsel regarding any possible unlawful order.

One Navy nurse at Guantanamo Bay refused to force feed a detainee. Legal proceedings dragged on against him for two years before the medical community supported him. Then, the Navy dropped its investigation. Force feeding is not torture, but the incident indicates the sort of actions that one can expect for refusing an order sen as unlawful. As I have mentioned on this website before, military members are required to refuse unlawful orders. The question is is such an order unlawful if there is some sort of legal cover? The Task & Purpose post does not address how a soldier might ascertain whether a given order is unlawful or not. Instead, it recommends that members of the military understand the rule of engagement, any protocols regarding detainees, and pay attention to those Law of Armed Conflicts briefings we receive each year. This is serious business. No one wants to risk his/her career over an unlawful order. See Task & Purpose post here.